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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff beca
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking points by the cia. she went on a defensive. and president obama left her, john, twisting slowly, slowly in the wind. she's gone. >> she'll still be our u.n. ambassador, though, pat. i give worst politician to mitt romney who never quite came across as human. and he lost. in part, because of his personality. >> she is going to stand you up, ambassador? >> yes. >> herm an cain again because a man who runs for the presidency who didn't think that his personal life would ultimately blow up presidency. >> does he have a job? >> he does. i don't know that he has -- >> he is a great -- he has a great future in talk-radio, i am sure. >> clarence, something for us? >> yes. worst politician, clint eastwood, although he is a good actor. >> this is very domestic. i will though it out on a larger scale for you. does that help you any, pat? worst p
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
like to the rest of the world, particularly europe where eurozone are taking drastic budget cuts and austerity measures that make our situation look tame. chris just returned from a trip to europe's capitals, including athens, and shares his experience of the complete devastation in greece currently dealing with. jared bernstein, storm former economic adviser. we don't know what the risks are of what might happen january 1st. there's a risk it could be horrible. that's all i'm saying. tell me what you saw in athens n greece when you were just there. >> i've traveled to greece quite a bit over the last few years for political work i've done there in the past. i don't know how to express it any more clearly than it was unbelievably sad and depressing. i mean, the country is in a great depression. unemployment is about 25%. unemployment among youths is about 55%. the economy contracted by 7.2% in the last quarter. those are numbers. i'll tell what you i saw which i think is more powerful. you go through different parts of greece, the greek stores closed everywhere. you go down near
, so how will he foot the bill? is a fat tax like the one that they have in europe the way to do it? a vat tax? a value added tax? is that story coming up next. how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combining your customized charts with leading-edge analysis tools from recognia so you can quily spot key trends and possible entry and exit points. we like this idea so much that we've applied for a patent. i'm colin beck of fidelity investments. our integrated technical analysis is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >> when you start talking about an issue of treatment of mental illness, the mentally ill should they have access to guns? well, there is a rational response that most americans have somebody who is not thinking clearly should not have a gun in their hands. but how do you define and that codify that into law? that's a much trickier issue. david: that was scott rasmussen with the latest poll on gun control and do
right now at where things stand in europe, you'll see that the ftse is barely higher. but you do see a bit of a decline for germany and france and modest moves across all of these markets. the bank of japan easing monetary policy again today, announcing an increase of its asset buying and lending program by more than $118 billion. that move was widely expected as part of the reason that you had seen the yen under quite a bit of pressure, yesterday, at least. you'll see right now that in japan, the market there actually closed down by just over 1%, 1.2% almost. the hang seng and the shanghai composite were slightly higher. oil prices this morning, you'll see right now, are down by about 4 cents to $89.94, so you have things to pick up in those prices over the last couple of days. and the ten-year note at this point which yesterday was yielding above 1.8%, dropping down to 77.2%. finally, take a look at the dollar and gold. yen is at 83.99. gold prices this morning with all these movements in the currency markets up by about $1.10. >>> winter storm draco is moving across the united sta
economic times in europe and also the cooling of the luxury goods boom have really taken their toll. i believe consumption is expected to get better going into the beginning of the year, new year's and popping all and all of that kind of thing. still, even with that, it's not going to be enough to lift overall sales from a year earlier. and what's really interesting, chris, is that a downturn in -- it really shows that this drop in champagne shows that champagne's fortunes are very closely tied to europe's economic health and to the confidence of french consumers who account for half of champagne sales. >> all those bubbly french people. thank you so much. who knew that half of champagne sales are in france. thank you, mandy. >> thank you. >>> in the mood for a great burger to go with your champagne? food and wine is out with a list of best burgers. minetta tavern in new york city, in-in-out burger in california and michael's genuine food and zuni cafe in san francisco. there's a whole list on our website. raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economi
the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor frank keating. next on the panel, we have the institute fellow and the r
that he is in the running tells you quite a lot about the importance of europe this year. earlier today, we were talking about the fact that they had picked trichet on in the past. he doesn't necessarily regret it. he said oppose dollars to some of the other types of running, they look for someone who is having a positive impact. they did consider angela merkel. that's the answers with regard to the person of the year. let me give you a quick sense of what else has been happening in europe overnight. the big moves, we're coming out of asia. 4.3% of the shanghai composite. it just had its best day in three years. this follows some pmi data that supported the idea of domestic spending. of course, it's been this coiled spring market over the last couple of weeks. after we saw the shanghai fall below the 2,000 level, it's in several big days. the news agency tweeted a picture of chinese stockbrokers grinning this morning to give you a sense of the mood. compare that to the nikkei which was down this morning going into the election these weekend likely to put shinzo abe back in power. he's s
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints, kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact, upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation, thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet, so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their hopes were going to be realized. and so it really did put a lot of people in motion during
in europe. she posted 700 pictures of herself, three of them she had beer in her hand or one in her hand and innocent photos. she is on a tour of a guinness factory and she lost her job as a teacher. you think that your 18-year-old or 21 or older child or grandchild can just take down a facebook page when they go job hunting, there is a company, social intelligence inc., which saves the last seven years of facebook pages. so then it becomes available to their employer when they are 22 years old. that, we have heard about. when i started doing research, i had no idea there was this whole other aspect, which was that what you do on the web is followed by data miners. i am a writer. i love dictionary.com. i've written books, but it puts 200 tracking mechanisms on your computer to follow where you go. google makes $36 billion a year, 90% of its income, from selling information. what does that mean? me that i look of a medical condition that health insurers can get that information and use it to discriminate. even the advertisements aren't innocent. when young people say they are going to com
: i have seen people wait an hour to see, in effect words. if you go to ancient cathedrals in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their
the neighbors of syria and our allies in europe -- some of which have now been ahead of us like france, britain -- that we will focus in on this immediate, really potentially disastrous threat that assad will use chemical and biological weapons. >> you said a moment ago that iran is our most dangerous enemy. >> right. >> if so, how far should we be willing to go to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons? >> well, you know, i just echo what everybody has said right up to president obama, that it's unacceptable for us to allow iran to become a nuclear state, that containment is not an acceptable alternative for all the reasons we know. i think that's absolutely right. it changes the whole balance of power in the middle east, it emboldens the terrorists like hamas and hezbollah that are agents of the iranian government. it probably, unless we're strong, leads some of our allies in the arab world to begin to accommodate to iran, and it's a threat to most of the rest of the world, including us. so, you know, the sanctions have been unprecedented, they're having an effect on the iranian economy
. a lot of strong words coming out of europe from the prime minister saying how disastrous it would be if we went off the fiscal cliff. >> i would rather see a compromise in getting it done right. clearly politicians and are ready to do a deal right. we see no inflation out of china and good growth out of china. that is a positive. the-is kicking out mario munsey who has been received well by wall street. >> mcdonald's have their quarterly numbers coming out in the stock did really well during a recession. it went up over a hundred and now it is about $90 a share. pretty good numbers for them. >> i'm loving it. apple has done well and is going to the end the year with the fiscal cliff with the tax increase issues. mcdonald's not so much. their sales are up 2.4%. then about 14,100 stores and united states. they did surprisingly well with the chatter on and bacon sandwich. the keep innovating products. i know you're saying tedder bacon and onion is not innovative and someone who is walking into mcdowell said does not watch television can see that they get a soda for a dollar. this wil
it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today, and i thought it was remarkable, we're in danger of becoming the party that defends the rich, anti-medicare, anti-social security, and there's no future in that k
, human rights and democracy across europe for the past six decades. not everyone agreed to this because it is in the middle of a financial crisis that's led to several protests and some say this contra tickets the values of the prize because it relies on military force to secure security -- to ensure security. >>> president obama is heading to michigan to meet with auto workers. the president wants the auto workers to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: dave, president obama is today continuing his push for more public support. he's talking about what will happen to the auto industry if the country falls off the fiscal cliff. let's take a live look now. the president's motorcade is expected to arrive any minute now, then he will be heading to detroit. there's some new hope for a deal after the president and house speaker john boehner held their first one-on-one meeting at the white house in weeks yesterday. now, both sides are mumm about the negotiations -- are mum about the negotiations but say the lines of communications are open. they have 20 minutes to reach an agreement even if th
on foreign relation, which is an important group to speak to in new york. she could go to europe and speak to yacht. she could people to the european parliament. >> bill: she'll make a lot of money giving speeches. >> she could and keep herself relevant until late -- by keeping herself out of the campaign rakes she keeps the target minimized. she's a very polarizing figure. lots of things for her critics to attack her on. the longer -- >> bill: real quick, do you expect a book from the woman? >> oh, yeah. absolutely. >> bill: okay. now, there is another woman in the c.i.a., and i want to spend a lot of time. about this woman who tracked down bin laden and then got into all kinds of trouble. do we know who this woman is? do you know her? >> yeah. we do believe we know who she is. we're not going to use her name on the program. but it's believed she was an analyst at c.i.a.'s afpac analysis unit, afghanistan and pakistan. she was an early believer that you could use -- you could track the courier system through al-qaeda in and around the cities, not the caves of pakistan, to get to bin laden
to ban gun laws that ban people from protecting themselves. all over europe there have been mass murders -- >> you're talking complete and utter -- >> people need to be able to defend themselves toe point of the crime and not for the police to come until after everybody's dead. >> what you said, mr. pratt, the gun deaths in australia and britain, they are 35 people killed a year. your country is 12,000. >> your murder rate is lower than hours, that is true. >> it's 35 against 12,000. >> your violent crime rate -- your violent crime rate is higher than ours, as is the violent crime rate in australia. america is not the wild west that you are depicting. we only have the problem in our cities and unhappily in our schools where people like you have been able to get laws put on the books that keep people from being able to defend themselves. i honestly don't understand why you would rather have people be victims of a crime than be able to defend themselves. it's incomprehensible. >> you're an unbelievably stupid man, aren't you? >> it seems to. he you're morally obtuse. you seem to be able to
and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy administration accessible to the widest possible audience. in the hope that the treasures of the kennedy library will inspire people growing up today in the same way the stories of the past spired my parents. on the 50th anniversary of my father's inauguration, in january 2001, we launched the digital archive from putting all the presents papers and correspondence and memos and photograph and film online, so that people can have access online to this material. not just scholars who come to boston. we created the president's desk, an interactive tool, so that kids can experience most important moments of the presidency. and we translated my father's major addresses into 40 languages online. this is the culmination of digitizing and creating the
on the battlefield. two of them were captured in europe, when north africa, and there were transported into harm's way, not out of harm's way. so there's a danger to the detainees, one entirely of the government's conduct a detainee's making. instead, the hardest part of this and the claim that you hear repeated the most often include about my colleague is that the real reason why judicial review in that context does not make sense is because it poses a threat to military operation, a threat that the courts will actively interfere with military operations and that the courts should not do that. let me be clear, a point that if that threat were provable, that's interference were there it would be a serious problem. we now have four years of jurisprudence and the d.c. courts involving guantanamo detainees were the government had this very same argument about the extent to which judicial review would interfere with military operations, interfere with the ability of the government to conduct the war and terrorism in the to do with intelligence gathering. for the most part there's been a suggestion t
, europe, the european union was fractured by debt and the plans to fix it. that saga is far from over. >>> number three, the housing market, finally, finally bottomed out. the combination of home prices and continued mortgage rates set off a building and buying spree. well-he well-heeled investors began to buy entire neighborhoods. and homeowners got more with a hefty down payment. >> and cnn predicts that barack obama will be reelected president of the united states. >> the election, more than just about obama and romney, more about socialism, and capitalism and spending, about the role government should have in your life. >> number one is the fiscal cliff. lawmakers saw it coming, but didn't bother to pay any attention to it until after the election. had they put politics aside and dealt with it earlier, who knows how strong the u.s. economy would be right now. >> up next, children in need of a home are caught in the middle of a dispute over human rights. and we'll meet one man reaching into his own pocket to help america ease its enormous debt. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea
forecast. europe offers the same lesson in reverse. thank you. as jim says, every time we talk about this, they keep taking the wrong -- lindsey graham said we're going to be greece. yeah, if we do what you want! the best way to generate jobs and growth is for the government to spend more, not less. and for taxes to stay lor owe become lower on the middle class. so you know, just -- >> roosevelt made that mistake in 1937 when the deficit hawks were saying we gotta slow this thing down. things started reverting to the depression era. levels and he quickly changed course. >> stephanie: rise finishes by saying most of the media have bought into the narrative it stems from an out-of-control budget deficit. we're talking about the fiscal cliff. he said -- let's see. interest rates he was talking about are lower than they've been in our living memory. in fact, if there was ever a time for america to borrow more to put people back to work, rebuilding our schools and crumbling infrastructure, it is now. robert reic
to their country of origin. >>> this is the most-watched singing contest in europe. it's got the glitz, the glamour, but -- >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly, you get a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. >> wow. what some european countries on the verge of bankruptcy, many feel participating in the contest, well, strikes the wrong chord. through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super s
coming from eastern europe and has the project blitz free is being led by a mysterious russian attacker and many targeted may not even realize it. >> you're someone with a substantial amount of money in your account. you logon one day and have a smaller amount than before but you've been hacked. that could happen to thousands of americans this coming spring. a new report says some of america's biggest banks, 30 of them, are at risk of a master cyber attack that could siphon millions of dollars from unsuspecting customers. >> we've found to date 3 and 500 devices that have been infected within the u.s. pat calhoon mcafee won't name the individual bank but account holders in many of the large mainstream banks are targeted. mcafee says this attack is from a cyber gag with a handle. >> he's trying to build attackers to expand the scope of the project. so that's the first thing. but how it's actually executed in the project itself is that he has computers that are basically monitoring and controlling all of these infected devices. >> calhoon says the attackers are going after individuals who
. the japanese markets, european countries, countries in europe which are precarious are in bigger trouble. the whole thing is going wacky, one guy is going to be standing in the middle of the storm, not grover norquist or some republican but the president of the united states who has to weather the storm and point the finger across the aisle to someone nobody else in the world knows. speaker boehner, will you solve this problem. i think times change. >> the economically the biggest risk is the sequestration. it's not the tax cuts going into effect. and -- >> you mean the millions of dollars -- >> the cuts that will be forced through in the next two years. that's a much bigger risk to the economy. >> therefore? >> therefore, if the president lets this thing -- look, the markets have already priced this in. >> i hear the opposite. i hear that they believe that grown-ups will do the job when they have to. they don't believe they're going to let us go over theically. >> i don't think the grown-ups believe they have to do the job by january 1st. i believe they believe the grown-ups have to do
overnight in asia, europe is following suit this morning, as fear dominates wall street. now the focus turns to the fed, and investors are hoping for some good news later today, after suffering the worst day in two years. >> credit rating agency basically said, we no longer have faith in you, the united states government, because we no longer believe your political system is capable of basic competence. the basic competence necessary to pay your bills. that republican-made, self-inflicted crisis and the resolution to it created this current man-made self-inflicted crisis that we're in right now. one we're lamely calling the fiscal cliff. the way republicans in congress and the president solved the debt ceiling crisis was to build this cliff, that we're now supposedly dangling off of. they inve' we're up against. the debt ceiling fight was a disaster, and now republicans, surprise, want to have that fight again. "the new york times" reports that one idea bouncing around the right side of the aisle is this. the republicans will extend tax cuts for the middle class, and then when they need to r
of central europe, particularly hungary, east germany and poland from 1944 to 1946, they tried to empty out the universities of historians and philosophers. and they were pretty effective at that. they got them to go west. as we know. or they exiled them in some way internally. in central europe, eastern europe as well. they encouraged more science and engineers, which is fifpblete but they weren't in a creative environment where they could do good work. democracy, as again the founders would have known this, you can't just be a science and engineer in a democracy to look way over the cliff to the mountains and beyond. so i'm very disturbed now to say that one great state university is talking about creating incentives for people to do science and engineering as undergraduates as against in effect creating disincentives for people to do humanities. you have to have people who can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class, new ideas. >> i agree with that. i would like to see more of an emphasis on the science and math. i guess -- we are going to in
's positive. in europe distortion of dishonesty. this is "hardball" the place for politics. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ customer erin swenson bought so, i'm happy. today. sales go up... i'm happy. it went out today... i'm happy. what if she's not home? (together) she won't be happy. use ups! she can get a text alert, reroute... even reschedule her package. it's ups my choice. are you happy? i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. happy. happy. happy. happy. (together) happy. i love logistics. >>> coming up the biggest lies of this election year. politifact's got the list and it's coming up next. you're watching "hardball." anncr: some politicians seem to think medicare and... social security are just numbers in a budget. well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earne
it was possible to just keep giving in to him, so that he would not carry out his plans to conquer europe. that's where the word "appeaseme "appeasement" really was the strongest and is really the indictment about how the western powers behave. >> first of all, what year did you flee check slozechoslovakic? >> in march of '39. >> and how old were you? >> i was 2. >> and my father was a member of the check slovak diplomatic service. and he was out of belgrade when i was born. >> did your father know mika's uncle, grand uncle, i guess who was president of czechoslovakia? >> definitely. he worked for them, and he felt very strongly -- czechoslovakia was a very interesting place in the interwar period. it was the only functioning democracy. it was created in a large part because of woodrow wilson's policies is and the constitution was modeled on the american one, except one big thing, it had an equal rights amendment in it, even then. and basically, there was a desire by people like my father, who was in his early 30s, to try to make sure that czechoslovakia stayed democratic. so he then left, he w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)

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